You don’t get closer to a hole-in-one than this!

Brandel Chamblee næsten hole-in-one

Brandel Chamblee was very close to getting a hole-in-one. Very VERY close!

During Q-School for the Senior Tour (PGA Champions Tour) in December 2019 he made this stroke on Hole 6 during his first round:

The ball is embedded in the top edge of the hole!

1) A hole-in-one?

Did he get a hole-in-one (i.e. was the ball considered to be holed)?

No. The definition of “Holed” states, that the ball is “Holed”, when it “…is at rest in the hole after a stroke and the entire ball is below the surface of the putting green.

Interpretation 1 to this definition elaborates: “When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.”

Thus, Chamblee’s ball was not holed.

2) What to do?

What should he do, then? Well, Rules 16.3a (1) and 13.1c (2) state, that he should mark and lift the ball, repair the damage and then “replace” the ball on the lip of the hole and play it from there.

-> Watch the Rules School video about Putting Greens (including repairing damage).

If he was unable to repair the damage, this is what he should do (according to Interpretation 13.1c(2)/2):

Damage to the hole is covered by Rule 13.1c as part of damage on a putting green. The player may repair a damaged hole unless the damage is natural wear that Rule 13.1c does not allow to be repaired.

For example, if the hole is damaged in removing the flagstick, it may be repaired by the player under Rule 13.1c, even if the damage has changed the dimensions of the hole.

However, if a hole has been damaged and the player cannot repair the damage (such as the hole cannot be made round again) or where natural wear that the player may not repair results in the hole not being round, the player should request that the Committee repair it.

3) He did get a birdie!

He got the birdie.

But you might call it an unlucky birdie :-).

/Brian

7 Comments
  1. terry says

    i think the rule has changed to any part of the is below the surface

    1. Larry Kniseley says

      Has not been changed.

      1. Larry Kniseley says

        For a ball that is embedded in the side of the hole all of it must be below the surface of the green.
        In other cases (ball at rest against flagstick) if any part of the ball is below the surface, the ball is holed.

  2. Sue says

    My understanding of the rule is that the ball no longer has to be completely below the surface of the putting green

  3. Steve Wright says

    Yes,, only any part of the ball needs to be below the surface. What a pity we cannot rely on this site to get the rules right!

    1. Dave Herrick says

      The site is correct. If one looks at the definition of “holed” it still recites that the entire ball must be at rest below the surface of the green. The specific instance in Rule 13 where the ball is considered holed when any part of the ball is below the surface of the green only applies when the ball is resting against the flagstick.

  4. Oswald Academy says

    Larry, Terry, Steve, Sue etc.:

    As Dave points out the blog/site is correct:

    In this special situation, where the ball is embedded in the side of the hole, all of the ball must be below surface to be holed. And this is true even if the ball touches the flagstick.

    See Interpretation 1 to the definition of “Holed”:

    When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

    Thank you for your comments – they are highly appreciated.

    /Brian, Oswald Academy

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.